Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz: “Tikkun–putting the world in order, even the correcting of one’s own soul, or healing its wounds-is not for the Sabbath.”

Rabbi Steinsaltz writes:

The Halakhah, the formal structure defining the order of mitzvot, prescribes in great detail the many things one is forbidden to do on the Sabbath.

All of them, however, are derived from the same basic idea: that the Sabbath is the day when one ceases to be a creator in the domain of the outer world and turns inward toward holiness.

This dual quality of the day, in which one is not only to refrain from creativity but also to complete creativity in spiritual terms, follows of course from this idea.

So that Tikkun--putting the world in order, even the correcting of one’s own soul, or healing its wounds-is not for the Sabbath.

The Sabbath is to be made available for a summation of the things acquired during the week, in an attempt to raise them spiritually, and knowingly or unknowingly to bring the week to a greater harmony, to a higher level of perfection.

Thus the Sabbath is the completion, or the crowning, of the week, when all that was done of a material and spiritual nature during the previous six days is summed up and enjoyed.

That is to say, it is brought to a higher level of consecration in order that again in the following week there will be another rise in the same cycle of days. 

–Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz

From ThenThirteen Petalled Rose, “Mitzvot”

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